Tips on Housebreaking Your Chihuahua


Housebreaking your Chihuahua

Some people will say that housebreaking your Chihuahua is very difficult. Unfortunately this is true and it is due to one specific reason. Whether the dog is male or female they have a tendency to mark their territories, and often. When they do this you must clean the area really well so that the odour is removed. You may have to use products that are specifically designed to remove the smell of urine.

When your Chihuahua marks his territory indoors, make sure that the dog knows you are displeased. Don’t spank him, speak to him in a tone of voice that lets him know you are very unhappy. When you see your Chihuahua urinate indoors take him outside immediately. When you come back indoors make sure he watches you clean the area. Rubbing your dog’s nose in it will have no effect and only ruin your relationship with your dog, so don’t do it.

Be consistent with your housebreaking. When your dog wakes up or finishes eating or playing take him outside. It is at these times that he will usually need to urinate. Do this consistently at those times. Once outside stay with him until he has finished and once he has make a fuss of him and let him know how pleased you are with him.

In general, housebreaking a Chihuahua is no different from housebreaking any other breed of dog. The real problem is his need to mark his territory. However, if the odour is removed and he is made aware that this is displeasing you, he will eventually stop doing it. It is often the case that Chihuahuas will stop this marking behaviour once they have been neutered or spayed, but there are exceptions.

Be patient with your pet, Chihuahuas can be very stubborn. Have a word with other owners and ask them how they solved the marking issue. If you keep your patience and continue looking for a solution you will resolve the problem in a way that satisfies both you and your Chihuahua.

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8 Comments on "Tips on Housebreaking Your Chihuahua"

  1. It is true, housebreaking my Chihuahua was very difficult, i thought she was housebroken, notice I said thought, until I noticed little round stains on my hallway carpet. She gets up in the middle of the night and tinkle, and because we are usually sleeping, it dries up by morning. We noticed these spots for months and couldn’t figure out what they were until one night I got up to tinkle myself and came out of the bathroom to notice her standing in the hallway right but a little round wet spot. I told her she was a bad dog and she went running back to her bed. The problem is that because she does it in the middle of the night makes it hard for me to catch her and show her that it is wrong. So, I’m thinking that I better get used to these little stains in the hallway and get use to scrubbing them weekly, cause I cannot catch her. Anyone have any ideas what to do?

  2. I have a 9 week old chihuahua and its been at me and my family for nearly 2 weeks now, she is already house trained by command to go in her litter and does her business, im 13 years old and Im the only one who trained. I think all you need to train a chihuahua is a nice tone of voice and some treats :)

  3. I have a male that is 7 years old and I’m keeping a female of around the same age, and they are both doing the same thing. I was thinking about putting some moth balls around, I’m getting aggravated at the little buggers.

  4. I have a 10 week old chihuahua and everytime he urinated on the carpet he would sit next to me watching how i removed the stain. He knows when it’s wrong, and today whenever he needs to go he runs to his training pad or to the door to go out. :)

  5. I have a 12 weeker, Rex, he is of the smaller clan at only 1.06 lbs. I have had him for about a week now, and he has only “went” in the house a very few times. It is NO means difficult at all to train them to go outside, but to train for the litter is more difficult. Puppy pads do not appeal to him at all either. There for it makes it hard for me to leave him home, so I bring him to work with me. Litter training, if anyone has any suggestions it would be greatly appreciated?!?
    P.S. your site is AWESOME!!!

  6. Mothballs are very poisonous to pets.

  7. Have a 10 month old female, she was fixed for a few months, then I got her spayed and she just didn’t give a damn anymore! I had someone come into my entryway and she proceeded to squat and poop right in front of his shoes! So frustrated with her, I have never owned a dog this horribly behaved! If she wasn’t my daughter’s she’d be up for adoption! I know half a dozen ppl who have at least one and they all say they are impossible to train, not one of these ppl has successfully trained one to go outside 100%! Ugh!

  8. We’ve had 4 chihuahuas (all rescues) and we’ve had the same problem with each of them: They’re easy to house train but virtually impossible to KEEP trained. At one point we had all four trained but then I kept my sister’s chihuahua for a week while she was on vacation. Immediately, it was like a giant pee bomb had gone off in my house. All five dogs running around marking their territory and leaving me nasty surprises everywhere. Once he was gone, it took months to sort my dogs back out again. Things were fine for awhile until they started entering their senior years. As each of them reached the age of around 7-9, all training went out the window again. The oldest two were completely incontinent by the time they passed from old age. They would even pee on their own bedding (sometimes looking me right in the eye while they did it)! The third one wasn’t as bad, but sadly he didn’t live as long so who knows how me might have ended up. Now my youngest is 7 years old and she’s starting to give us problems. The weird thing is, she doesn’t pee in the house, only poops. Every. Single. Day. All attempts to break her of this habit have been unsuccessful. On the plus side, my labrador has taken it upon herself to be the “Poop Police”. When I hear her barking, I know to come running because it means my chihuahua is getting ready to make a deposit on the living room rug. Every time I have to clean up one of her messes I tell myself two things: 1. This is a labor of love and she’s worth it… 2. Never, ever, ever, ever again will I ever own another chihuahua.

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